Back on the island

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Early morning. Sunrise over Skopelos. The sea is calm. It is quiet. We are back on the island. Back after six weeks of travel. Back in our own little paradise.

The first cup of coffee in the morning tastes like heaven. I walk barefoot in the grass, inspecting the garden. It has fared reasonably well during our absence. We have been lucky. Roaming goats have passed the area. They have eaten a lot in our neighbour’s garden. All geraniums are gone there, down to the root. But our garden has been untouched by the goats. Thank you, goats.

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The rest of our car ride through Europe went smoothly. We stayed a few days in Prague. We stayed in the old, cute little village of Hall-in-Tirol outside Innsbruck in Austria. We drove down to Ancona in Italy where we caught the ferry to Igoumenitsa on the Greek mainland, just south of the Albanian border. After crossing Greece, we took the final ferry from Volos to Skiathos.

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Back again. Travelling is enjoyable. Not travelling is also enjoyable. Now we will stay here for the next few months. Staying in our little paradise. Living a small scale life. Eating, drinking, sleeping. Gardening, swimming, reading, socializing with friends. Enjoying sunrises and coffee. Simply enjoying life. Enjoying the simple life.

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It is great to be back again.

Meeting a depressed President

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In the evening, we enjoy a Black Light theater performance. This is a theater genre that has been created and developed in Prague. It is unique, fascinating and funny. If you visit Prague, this is a must.
The evening is warm as we walk back to our apartment. Lots of people are out in the streets. Walking on the street stones of Dlouha Street, small street stones typical for Prague, another memory comes to my mind. A memory from the Jas Gripen activities back in the late 1990’s. We were to meet the President of the Czech Republic, Vaclav Havel.
We, all the twenty of us, gathered in a rather empty room adjoining the President’s office. No furniture in the room, just a microphone on a stand in a corner. We were served drinks. As we were standing there, sipping our drinks, Vaclav Havel entered the room. A rather small and thin man. Previously a heavy smoker. Only one lung left after lung cancer surgery. The hero of the Silk Revolution. The hero of the people. The first President of the free Czechoslovakia. He walked slowly straight up to the microphone. Someone introduced him.
He did not smile. He did not really look at us. A very serious man, I thought. Or was he shy? He took out a paper from his pocket and started to give a speech in English. I don’t really remember what he talked about. It was probably one of those polite speeches that was given to every foreign group of visitors to the President’s office.
Still no smile. Still no eye contact. No face movements. A soft low voice. The speech was monotonous. President Vaclav Havel seemed to be bored. No, bored is the wrong word. Depressed is a better word. A depressed President? No chance to ask questions after the presentation. After the speech, Peter Wallenberg and his companion Erik Belfrage went over to Vaclav Havel. Even though we were in the same room, I could not hear their discussion. But I watched Havel. Still no smile, no happiness in his face.
Then Vaclav Havel left. Someone announced that the President had left for the day. But we were free to visit his office in the next room. A rather dark room with dim lighting. Thick curtains in the windows. A big desk, rather empty except for some documents and books. Some photos in frames. Several telephones on the desk. On the side, a big Czech flag. Behind the desk there was a book case with books. On the walls, framed photos, some of them in black and white. I recognized a younger Vaclav Havel in many of them. Pictures from the Silk Revolution. Pictures from happier days.
I still wonder today… Vaclav Havel, Mr. President, why were you so depressed? Was it the fact that your health was giving way? Did you have personal problems? A lonely soul in the presidential palace? Or did you just have a lousy day like all of us have sometimes?
I shall never know the answer….

The day Peter Wallenberg shocked me

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Back in Prague, the city I used to live in for six years. We are having dinner…..Walking back to our apartment from the restaurant, memories come back.
Sweden tried to sell Saab’s military fighter airplane Jas Gripen to the Czech Republic. A delegation of almost ten people, headed by Peter Wallenberg, head of the powerful Swedish industrial Wallenberg family, Saab and their partner British Aerospace came on a sales mission to Prague.
But the size of this delegation was not big enough. The Jas Gripen group had to impress their Czech hosts. So the head of every Swedish company with Wallenberg connections in the Czech Republic had to take part. We were the backdrop to the big boys in the Jas Gripen delegation, posing in the background at every meeting with our well combed hair, dark suits and conservative ties. We were to be seen but not to be heard. Quantity but not quality.
In between meetings, Peter Wallenberg, now in his 70’s, asked me how the merger between Astra and Zeneca came along. This was a pharmaceutical megamerger between the bigger Swedish Astra and the smaller British Zeneca. I had been lucky. Soon after the top positions in the new AstraZeneca group had been filled, I was told that I would keep my job as the regional head of the companies in Central and Eastern Europe. I took part in meetings in London, in Manchester, in Philadelphia and in Södertälje. Astra’s chairman Percy Barnevik stressed the importance of speed. The new organizations had to be up and running as soon as possible.
In every country, there were now two company presidents, two finance managers and so on. One of the two had to go. A lot of good people had to be fired. The consequences of a merger. A continued career or unemployment? Life or death? It was my job in my region to decide who was staying and who was going. It was tough. I could see the pain in people’s eyes as I had to inform them that their employment was over. But the job had to be done. That’s why I was there. And with time, we again had good functioning organizations.
I gave a fairly positive answer to Peter Wallenberg’s question about the merger. Then he dropped a bomb shell.
“I don’t believe in this merger”, he said. I don’t think he saw how shocked I was. He, the head of the powerful Wallenberg Family and the biggest Swedish owner of Astra, did not believe in the merger? Supposedly, Peter Wallenberg was a key player in the merger. Or wasn’t he? I wanted to ask questions. Why then the merger? Why then the firing of so many good people? But I couldn’t get a word out. Peter Wallenberg continued talking. He told me that he had been living and working in England. “I know the British”, he said. “You can’t trust them”.
An old tycoon’s view…..
Who were the winners and the losers in this merger? On the winning side, you had the shareholders of course. Always the shareholders. Great Britain was a winner, the head office moved to London. And those of us who kept our jobs, like me, were winners. Higher salaries and bigger bonuses. All those who lost their jobs were of course the losers. As was the country of Sweden. With time, the British took over. Sweden had lost one if its big industrial flag ships. Maybe Peter Wallenberg had been right.
Early summer in Prague is beautiful. We are walking back to the hotel. A horse and carriage, filled with tourists, pass us in the street. The echoes of the hooves of the horses are bouncing on the walls as I try to shake off the memories of the merger. Not all of them were good.
Tomorrow, we shall continue to explore Prague, one of my favourite cities in Europe……

In the center of Europe; Prague, the enchanting city

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We have arrived in Prague. Beautiful Prague. Prague, the city that is located north of Paris and west of Stockholm. The city in the center of Europe.

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The atmosphere in Prague is enchanting. The city is full of history and culture. Full of beauty. Full of tourists and stars. Beautiful buildings and old statues. Street artists and musicians. The city that has it all. The city that is full of the expected and full of surprises
Summer has come to Prague. We walk more than ten kilometers this first day, from our apartment near the Old Town Square to the square. We watch the Astronomical Clock, from 1865, sharp on the hour, where the wooden statues of the 12 apostles parade in the clock windows every hour. We cross the Vltava River on Charles Bridge, the bridge built in 1357 by Charles IV. On the bridge, a star of some kind is being photographed. A local celebrity?

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Prague is full of street cafes and bars and we take a break for half an hour, having both tiramisu and a beer. Prague is the capital of beers. Our walk continues up to Prague castle, the biggest castle complex in the world. We stop for a concert at Wallenstein garden to listen to beautiful music and to rest our legs. Slowly, we cross Manesuv Bridge, stopping occasionally to watch the beauty that Prague constantly offers. Back in our apartment, we rest our tired legs, watch TV news and we are reminded that there is a world outside fairytale Prague.

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When the sun sets, we leave the apartment again. The street restaurants are full of people. We have Czech food, Czech beer. We have a full Czech satisfaction….

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Time to go; Greece, here we come!

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It’s time to leave. We are packing the car. Boxes. Bags. Suitcases. Skaithos, here we come!

This first day, we will drive 650 kilometers, from Stockholm to Trelleborg, a small town in the very south of Sweden. From here, there are ferries to Germany and Poland. We will have dinner in Trelleborg, then board the ten o’clock evening ferry to Rostock in Germany. After sleeping a night in the cabin onboard, we shall arrive in Germany at 06.00.

After a couple of hours drive on Thursday, we will reach the ring road around Berlin. We may get stuck in heavy traffic here. It is peak hour traffic, people going to work in Berlin. From Berlin, we have another 350 kilometers to Prague, the capital of the Czech Republic, where we will spend a couple of nights.

It is a beautiful morning in Stockholm. Sun shining from a clear sky. The weather forecast for the next two days is fairly good. Mixed weather later today in the south of Sweden, risk of light rain. Going through Germany tomorrow, warmer and cloudy, possibly no rain. Good driving weather.

Looking forward to being on the road again…

From Stockholm, Sweden, to Skiathos Island, Greece; preparing for the drive

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After our trip to north America, we have now arrived in Stockholm, Sweden. It is now time to plan and prepare for the drive by car from Stockholm to Skiathos Island in Greece.

The distance door to door is 2620 kilometers. I have measured the distance. I have done this trip so many  times now so I do not need a gps or a map. The trip plan is always based on the fact that we want to drive through Italy on a Sunday; lorry traffic is banned on Italian highways on Sundays. Normally, we leave Stockholm on Friday after lunch and arrive on Monday evening on Skiathos Island.

But this time, it will take a little bit longer. In the past, we always wanted to drive from A to B as quickly as possible. But now we will deviate from our normal route and stay in one of the beautiful cities on the way. We plan a stopover in Prague a couple of days.

There is always a lot to think of before we depart. The car must be serviced. A lot to buy. Things for the house. Some food stuff. What is available on a Greek island is limited so we stock up. Also, ferries and hotels have to be booked.

The weather in Stockholm is beautiful, sunny and not very warm. We try to enjoy this beautiful city as much as time permits. We see friends. We are fighting our jet lag. After a month of eating out or in friends’ homes, we enjoy cooking our own food again.

In a few days, we are on our way… Greece, here we come!